Blue Mornings

by al Riggs

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about

Here is a new album and a new beginning.
None of the songs are about me so I thought it was fitting to put a picture of me on the cover.

The sound is junky, skittering folk music. No krautrock jams to be found here, the songs are short, simple, and sad just like mom used to make. That's why there's lucky Thirteen of them.

The songs here were inspired by the life and artwork of Keith Haring, whom I've been a fan of even unknowingly since I was very little. His art brought queerness to the forefront and the want for greater empathy between races, ages, creeds, and cultures (even subcultures). He valued the act of making art and the act of discovering art over any greater moneymaking venture, wanting his artwork to rather be in the hands of a kid who could only afford a $13 t-shirt than in the parlor of a New York socialite.

With this album I want to bring to light a kind of working class queerness that I've experienced first hand living in North Carolina my whole life. We're out there, we're making your food and driving you around, and we are more than happy to be here.

I dedicate this album to the memories of Keith Haring and Rock Hudson and to the city of Durham. You are loved and loving and will emerge strong through any hardship or criticism. Long Live and Long Life.

-al

credits

released April 15, 2016

al played all sounds heard and wrote all words yelped

"'gradulations" contains a sample from the score of the film "Bloodbeat", directed by Fabrice A. Zaphiratos
"What Are They Doing In Heaven Today" and "Rock Hudson" contain elements and interpolations of "What Are They Doing In Heaven Today?" trad. but arranged by Washington Phillips and also "Gone Away" by Matthew E. White

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about

al Riggs and The Inconveniences Greensboro, North Carolina

No longer shackled by the inconveniences, al Riggs now has lowercased his name and returns with "We're All Adults Here", a spiritual sequel to "Husbands". A collection of krautrock inspired mini-orchestras about the town he abandoned and why he had to leave, "WAAH" is a crunchy, creamy fever dream. RIYL: nervousness, quiet screaming, Not The Doors. Torch songs for the unmotivated and afraid. ... more

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